Archive for the ‘World Disasters’ Category

Chinese Intercept Ground Baby Parts

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

I’m glad I don’t live in South Korea or China. I might have ingested human baby parts. There’s a report that Chinese customs officials have intercepted 17,000 pills filled with powdered baby parts from China. They were purported to be both a stamina-enhancer and a medical panacea in parts of Asia. What ?

The Daily Mail explains:

“The grim trade is being run from China where corrupt medical staff are said to be tipping off medical companies when babies are aborted or delivered still-born.

The tiny corpses are then bought, stored in household refrigerators in homes of those involved in the trade before they are removed and taken to clinics where they are placed in medical drying microwaves. Once the skin is tinder dry, it is pummeled into powder and then processed into capsules along with herbs to disguise the true ingredients from health investigators and customs officers.”

They say that the capsules were confiscated – all of them. No one has been arrested, as the authorities deemed that 17,000 pills was only a small amount. Sounds like a lot to me.

Dying Rooms

There are reports that not only aborted or stillborn babies were used in the pills – but they also put baby parts in there of children left to die in China’s “dying rooms”. I guess the Chinese are only allowed to have one child per family. So if they make more than that – they just let them die after birth. What a waste. It makes me sick.

There are reports that say the South Koreans are unwilling to press the issue for fear of creating a diplomatic rift with China, instead preferring to let Chinese officials investigate and take any necessary action when the Chinese intercepted ground baby parts.

Allegedly, the baby corpses were supplied by hospitals in China that sold the them to the company that manufactures the tablets for the equivalent of around 20,000 yen, (US$200.00) each. The pills were selling for the equivalent of 600 yen, (USD6.00) each.

 

http://youtu.be/k81PUg_YaBA

The Vow

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

My last post was how stupid Valentine’s Day is. And, it is. This trailer for the the movie, The Vow, looks really good. It happens to be debuting on Valentine’s Day – so, I’ll post it to be nice. My ex-husband is always telling me to be nice. The movie looks like it might be good. I’ll probably cry. It has Rachel McAdams in it from The Notebook, which I thought was really sappy. And lame. Hopefully, this is better than The Notebook.

In The Vow, a married couple has a car accident and his wife, Paige loses her memory. She doesn’t recognize her husband or anything about their love. So, he has to try to win back her heart again. She’s really resistant to his love. He keeps trying. Let’s see if The Vow is a movie that I like. I wonder if she ever really loved him?

Valentine’s Day

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Video about how I really feel that Valentine’s Day. We should celebrate our love all the time – not just on Valentine’s Day. So, I agree with Zaid Ali. And, I’m not saying that just because I’m single either …. Although, I do think couples in love are adorable. Idiot. Lol.

US, Britain & France Blast Gadhafi Defenses

Monday, March 21st, 2011

*I totally feel for their citizens. It sounds to me like Gadhafi has some of his people either too terrorized into thinking for themselves – or – maybe he just bought them off. That cash only works for so long. The terrorism, that’ll work. Sounds like he’s been doing that for quite the while and a small segment of their society had just had enough.

By HADEEL AL-SHALCHI and RYAN LUCAS, Associated Press – March 20, 2011

TRIPOLI, Libya – Moammar Gadhafi vowed a “long war” as allied forces launched a second night of strikes on Libya on Sunday, and jubilant rebels who only a day before were in danger of being crushed by his forces now boasted they would bring him down. The U.S. military said the international assault would hit any Gadhafi forces on the ground that are attacking the opposition.

The U.S. military said the bombardment so far — a rain of Tomahawk cruise missiles and precision bombs from American and European aircraft, including long-range stealth B-2 bombers — had succeeded in heavily degrading Gadhafi’s air defenses.

The international campaign went beyond hitting anti-aircaft sites. U.S., British and French planes blasted a line of tanks that had been moving on the rebel capital Benghazi, in the opposition-held eastern half of the country. On Sunday, at least seven demolished tanks smoldered in a field 12 miles (20 kilometers) south of Benghazi, many of them with their turrets and treads blown off, alongside charred armored personnel carriers, jeeps and SUVs of the kind used by Gadhafi fighters.

A building in Gadhafi’s compound was hit and badly damaged late Sunday. An Associated Press photographer at the scene said half of the round, three-story building was knocked down, and smoke was rising from it. About 300 Gadhafi supporters were in the compound at the time. It was not known if any were hurt.

“I feel like in two days max we will destroy Gadhafi,” said Ezzeldin Helwani, 35, a rebel standing next to the smoldering wreckage of an armored personnel carrier, the air thick with smoke and the pungent smell of burning rubber. In a grisly sort of battle trophy, celebrating fighters hung a severed goat’s head with a cigarette in its mouth from the turret of one of the gutted tanks.

The strikes that began early Sunday gave immediate, if temporary, relief to Benghazi, which the day before had been under a heavy attack that killed at least 120 people. The city’s calm on Sunday highlighted the dramatic turnaround that the allied strikes bring to Libya’s month-old upheaval: For the past 10 days, Gadhafi’s forces had been on a triumphant offensive against the rebel-held east, driving opposition fighters back with the overwhelming firepower of tanks, artillery, warplanes and warships.

Now Gadhafi’s forces are potential targets for U.S. and European strikes. The U.N. resolution authorizing international military action in Libya not only sets up a no-fly zone but allows “all necessary measures” to prevent attacks on civilians.

But the U.S. military, for the time being at the lead of the international campaign, is trying to walk a fine line over the end game of the assault. It is avoiding for now any appearance that it aims to take out Gadhafi or help the rebels oust him, instead limiting its stated goals to protecting civilians.

But the U.S. military, for the time being at the lead of the international campaign, is trying to walk a fine line over the end game of the assault. It is avoiding for now any appearance that it aims to take out Gadhafi or help the rebels oust him, instead limiting its stated goals to protecting civilians.

At the Pentagon, Navy Vice Adm. William E. Gortney underlined that strikes are not specifically targeting the Libyan leader or his residence in Tripoli. He said that any of Gadhafi’s ground forces advancing on the rebels were open targets.

“If they are moving on opposition forces … yes, we will take them under attack,” he told reporters.
“We judge these strikes to have been very effective in significantly degrading the regime’s air defense capability,” Gortney said. “We believe his forces are under significant stress and suffering from both isolation and a good deal of confusion.”

A military official said Air Force B-2 stealth bombers flew 25 hours in a round trip from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri and dropped 45 2,000-pound bombs.

What happens if rebel forces eventually go on the offensive against Gadhafi’s troops remains unclear. Gortney would not say whether strikes would hit Libyan troops fighting back against rebel assaults.

U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said late Sunday that the U.S. expects turn over control of the operation to a coalition headed by France, Britain or NATO “in a matter of days,” reflecting concern that the U.S. military was stretched thin by its current missions. Turkey was blocking NATO action, which requires agreement by all 28 members of the alliance.

Danish Defense Minister Gitte Lillelund Bech confirmed to The Associated Press that four Danish F-16s took part in missions over Libya on Sunday. “We are using military means, but there are also a lot of other means we can use to make sure that Gadhafi will not be running Libya in the future,” she said.

Sunday night, heavy anti-aircraft fire erupted repeatedly in the capital, Tripoli, with arcs of red tracer bullets and exploding shells in the dark sky — marking the start of a second night of international strikes. Gadhafi supporters in the streets shot automatic weapons in the air in a show of defiance. It was not immediately known what was being targeted in the new strikes.

Libyan army spokesman Col. Milad al-Fokhi said Libyan army units had been ordered to cease fire at 9 p.m. local time, but the hour passed with no letup in military activity.

Gadhafi vowed to fight on. In a phone call to Libyan state television Sunday, he said he would not let up on Benghazi and said the government had opened up weapons depots to all Libyans, who were now armed with “automatic weapons, mortars and bombs.” State television said Gadhafi’s supporters were converging on airports as human shields.

He called the international assault “simply a colonial crusader aggression that may ignite another large-scale crusader war.” “We promise you a long war,” he said.

Throughout the day Sunday, Libyan TV showed a stream of what it said were popular demonstrations in support of Gadhafi in Tripoli and other towns and cities. It showed cars with horns blaring, women ululating, young men waving green flags and holding up pictures of the Libyan leader. Women and children chanted, “God, Moammar and Libya, that’s it!”

 

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